Let’s Discuss — Self-Inflicted Wounds by Aisha Tyler

self-inflicted wound (n): a spectacularly humiliating, and often hilarious, incident entirely of one’s own making.
see also: you did it to yourself.

Let me preface this discussion by saying I don’t read very much non-fiction. Well…I haven’t since college wherein most of what I read for four years was non-fiction stuff. Often dry, very boring, comprehensive and lengthy things sometimes related to my academic and/or professional interests–many times not. But I still think it’s important to ground yourself from whatever cloud your fiction books might place you upon and read something a little different…or at least in theory that’s how I feel. I do read a lot of news and policy magazines for fun …anyways, like I was saying, I haven’t read a lot of non-fiction of any reputable length or of any serious topic in quite a while*. So to ease back into it, I thought I would start with something light and entertaining: Aisha Tyler’s Self-Inflicted Wounds: Heartwarming Tales of Epic Humiliation.

I can admit, I have a mild obsession with Aisha Tyler. Nothing crazy. I admire her success and I feel we have a lot in common (not the success per se, but gender, height, melanin content) Also she’s a gamer and doesn’t take herself too seriously and she seems pretty cool. So I figure hey, why not read her book. In a nutshell, Tyler has compiled a variety of thirty or so very embarrassing and humiliating short stories from her childhood to adulthood; and from what I understand are actually real incidents, give or take a few name changes and vague details. Honestly, some of them are very embarrassing and funny. Others are kind of blah, but that’s to be expected. Not every story is going to possess the same shock value. Some stories are relatable. For example, The Time I Cut Myself In Half, The Time I Almost Set Myself on Fire or The Bunny Fiasco. I can relate in some twisted way to all three–Do you know how many baby birds I tried to save from the circle of life as a child? And I too have a scar that oddly splits my chest in half. I’ve pondered its’ origins for years and still don’t know why it’s there–Tyler’s story poses a good possibility, haha. Or like that one time I decided to place my entire left hand on the face of an iron, which I knew could very well be hotter than Hades…I was nine (that’s my excuse) Good thing I’m right-handed. And yes my lovely mother made me go to school, burns and all. Lesson learned. And that’s kind of the point of all Tyler’s outrageous tales. They all point to a lesson**, or lead to an inspirational “dust yourself off and try again” message.

But even for the stories I didn’t relate to as much, like The Time I Killed a Hobo or The Time I Created My First Sketch Character , I never for a second doubted her sincerity. As a reader I had to accept there are some stories that no matter how many times or ways you tell them, you just had to be there. And sometimes it’s damn near impossible to get into the author’s head. like withThe Time I Fell Asleep on the Patio Furniture at a Birthday Party.  I’m still blank-faced at that one.

Life is short, and no one gives a shit about your problems. Get up, get out there, and as the kids say, get to grinding. Do that hundredth set, and then do the hundred-and first. And then do one hundred more. You’re just getting started (159)

Self-Inflicted Wounds is a super fun and quick read. Here are some things to consider while reading it:

  • Aisha Tyler writes exactly how she speaks. Exactly. No ghost writing here.
  • Don’t feel obligated to read every single footnote. Sometimes it ruins the flow of already short stories. If you read something funny or even not that funny, then think something very childish or dirty about it, and see a superscript–Tyler beat you to it. No need to read the footnote.
  • Don’t read more than four or five stories per sitting. They will probably lose their essence if you read more. Although everyone’s different.
  • Don’t go into this thinking you’ll be on the floor, in tears laughing, spitting your coffee on your lap, cackling out loud. Just don’t. Way to set yourself up for a disappointment.
  • Enjoy each tongue-in-cheek story with a half a grain of salt.
  • Allow yourself to make connections to her stories–think about all the stupid things you’ve done, or embarrassing things that have happened and laugh. Smiling is okay too. I smiled a lot while reading this.

* Last non-fiction I read was The Devil in the White City. Before that–The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.

** Debatable. There’s the occasional disconnect between the buildup in the story and then the takeaway for the reader and resolution posed by Tyler.

Advertisements

2 comments

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s